An Opportunity to Heal the Hardships and Put NC on a Resilient Foundation – North Carolina Justice Center

North Carolina can afford to meet the challenges we face with the pandemic and the downturn and its aftermath, but our leaders must choose a path that makes systemic investments for the good of all, not just the powerful few. This year’s decisions can mean the difference between leaving more of North Carolina or fixing the damage with a stand-alone approach.

It is by going all out that we each have the opportunities and the support to do well.

Too often we do not make the connection between conditions in communities and political choices, but public policies have a powerful role to play in stimulating or addressing the challenges and opportunities that people face every day. By considering not only how policy choices relate to outcomes, but whether those outcomes vary based on race, income, or geography, we can also ensure that we are advancing the policies necessary to ensure that everyone has the resources. resources and support needed to reach their full potential. .

Ultimately, it is the well-being of people that will ensure the health of our economy and our democracy.

Find out what’s going on in North Carolina, then dig deeper into your county’s data with our snapshots. Then relate those metrics to your experience and the political conversations we need to have to make sure everyone can thrive.

Table 1. Use of dollars available from the general state fund

Do How we got here Choice of financing The proposal of the CN General Assembly The governor’s proposal
47 percent of renter households in North Carolina are burdened with rent.

1 in 6 households is behind on rent.

The state’s lack of investment in building affordable housing makes it difficult for families to find housing in many communities. Develop the infrastructure of local organizations providing rental assistance and the value of rental assistance while ensuring that the future supply of affordable housing is greater in each community by financing the Trust Fund for affordable state housing. the CN General Assembly offers no increase in funding for the State Affordable Housing Trust Fund and the Workforce Housing Loan Fund. the governor’s proposal doubled the credit to the state’s housing trust fund to $ 15 million, but still providing too little to meet needs. No funds have been allocated to the Workforce Home Loans Program. Two new offices to coordinate housing programs and policies – one at DHHS and one at the Department of Commerce – have been proposed.
250,000 adults not working due to childcare responsibilities

88 percent of students entering high schools graduate within four years

There was no fragmented budget for preschool the last time a budget was passed.

The latest federal expansion of the Child Care and Development Block Grant has been compromised by state action to withdraw more funds from preschool education.

State dollars could ensure that providers are reimbursed for providing quality care equitably by enacting provisions in Bill 574 and ensuring that low-income families can access quality child care by putting state dollars to increase child care assistance and increase wages for early childhood educators. the CN General Assembly offers :

No increase in the General Fund for Child Care and Preschool Education.

the Governor offers :

Funding for 1,700 additional child care spaces for working families in need and increasing support for the WAGE $ program which increases the low wages earned by early childhood educators.

11% of North Carolinians have no health insurance coverage.

More than 400,000 North Carolina residents would be eligible for affordable, high-quality health insurance through Medicaid if the Medicaid expansion were implemented.

The North Carolina General Assembly refused to take the option provided by the Affordable Care Act and affirmed as a state option in court cases in 2021 to provide affordable health care coverage to those who cannot access it otherwise. Expand Medicaid to receive additional incentive dollars and federal support to cover the costs of providing health care coverage to people newly able to access health care. the CN General Assembly offers no policy or investment to provide comprehensive coverage to those within the coverage gap. the Governor offers

the Medicaid expansion that will cover North Carolina, generate significant health and economic benefits for the state, and provide an additional $ 1.2 billion in federal funding to the state.

247,000 unemployed people in North Carolina are looking for work.

Over 150,000 North Carolina residents lost federal UI assistance on September 4

North Carolina has taken a failed approach to job creation that focuses on big business largesse instead of essential role that people have in keeping the economy and businesses growing.

North Carolina has not removed barriers to capital and growth opportunities for businesses owned by people of color, missing out on the chance to bolster employment opportunities in more communities than Wake, Durham and Mecklenburg.

North Carolina lawmakers overhauled the state’s unemployment insurance system to make it less accessible and provide lower wage replacement for shorter periods.

Invest state dollars in paid vocational training and necessary support such as transportation and childcare for unemployed people in training.
On the political side, the General Assembly could remedy the shortcomings of our unemployment insurance system and take advantage of the funds available to start a short-term compensation program.
the CN General Assembly offers

salary increases for home helpers through an increase in the rate of Medicaid providers; and increases for school support staff such as guards and bus drivers.

the Governor offers a recurring annual investment of $ 40 to create the NC GROW (Getting Ready for Opportunities in the Workforce) program for
encourage enrollment and retention in high demand training programs. The governor also proposed to address some of the major problems with the state unemployment insurance system, including setting the state’s maximum duration at 26 weeks and increasing the maximum benefit amount.
31 percent of North Carolinians are considered low income (gain of less than $ 51,500 for a family of four)

North Carolina residents with incomes in the bottom 60% pay more than 9% of their income in state and local taxes

The tax cuts since 2013 have not corrected the fact that everyone pays taxes and not just through income tax.

The elimination of the state EITC removed a key tool for increasing family incomes and fixing the tax code upside down.

Establish a government refundable earned income tax credit and make sure our tax code asks rich, profitable corporations to contribute what they owe. the CN General Assembly offers move in the opposite direction by cutting income tax rates which will send 74% of the personal income tax cut to the richest 20% and largely benefit large profitable multi-state corporations. The governor proposes

create a refundable state-earned income tax credit that would help low-wage working families make ends meet and reduce the share of their income going to state and local taxes.

47 percent of renter households in North Carolina are burdened by the rent

1 in 6 households is behind in rent.

The state’s lack of investment in building affordable housing makes it difficult for families to find housing in many communities. Develop the infrastructure of local organizations providing rental assistance and the value of rental assistance while ensuring that the future supply of affordable housing is greater in each community by funding the Trust Fund for affordable state housing. the CN General Assembly offers o Expanding funding for the State Affordable Housing Trust Fund, the Workforce Housing Loan Fund. the governor’s proposal doubled the credit to the state’s housing trust fund to $ 15 million, but still providing too little to meet needs. No funds have been allocated to the Workforce Home Loans Program. Two new offices to coordinate housing programs and policies – one at DHHS and one at the Department of Commerce – have been proposed.

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